The IRS just released its audit statistics for the 2020 fiscal year and fewer taxpayers had their returns examined as compared with prior years. But even though a small percentage of returns are being chosen for audit these days, that will be little consolation if yours is one of them.

Latest statistics

Overall, just 0.5% of individual tax returns were audited in 2020. However, as in the past, those with higher incomes were audited at higher rates. For example, in 2020, 2.2% of taxpayers with adjusted gross incomes (AGIs) of between $1 million and $5 million were audited. Among the richest taxpayers, those with AGIs of $10 million and more, 7% of returns were audited in 2020.
Continue Reading IRS Audits may be Increasing, so be Prepared

Are you age 65 and older and have basic Medicare insurance? You may need to pay additional premiums to get the level of coverage you want. The premiums can be expensive, especially if you’re married and both you and your spouse are paying them.

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But there may be a bright side: You may qualify for a tax break for paying the premiums.


Continue Reading Writing Off Medicare Premiums on Seniors’ Tax Returns

thumbnail image of a PKF Texas white paper about the November 18 PPP Loan ruling impacting tax planningThe IRS released new ruling and guidance on November 18, 2020 for businesses who received a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Loan, Revenue Ruling 2020-27 and Revenue Procedure 2020-51, which clarifies the tax deductibility of expenses related to loans that have not been forgiven.

The PKF Texas team wants to share with you a special

If you’re getting close to retirement, you may wonder: Are my Social Security benefits going to be taxed? And if so, how much will you have to pay?

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It depends on your other income. If you’re taxed, between 50% and 85% of your benefits could be taxed. (This doesn’t mean you pay 85% of your benefits back to the government in taxes. It merely that you’d include 85% of them in your income subject to your regular tax rates.)


Continue Reading Paying Tax on Your Social Security Benefits

While you probably don’t have any problems paying your tax bills, you may wonder: What happens in the event you (or someone you know) can’t pay taxes on time?

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Most importantly, don’t let the inability to pay your tax liability in full keep you from filing a tax return properly and on time. In addition, taking certain steps can keep the IRS from instituting punitive collection processes.

Here’s a look at the options.


Continue Reading Can’t Pay Individual Taxes? Here’s What to Know

Married couples often wonder whether they should file joint or separate tax returns. The answer depends on your individual tax situation.

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It generally depends on which filing status results in the lowest tax. But keep in mind that, if you and your spouse file a joint return, each of you is “jointly and severally” liable for the tax on your combined income. And you’re both equally liable for any additional tax the IRS assesses, plus interest and most penalties. This means that the IRS can come after either of you to collect the full amount.


Continue Reading The Benefits for Married Couples Filing Taxes Separately