thumbnail image of a PKF Texas white paper about the November 18 PPP Loan ruling impacting tax planningThe IRS released new ruling and guidance on November 18, 2020 for businesses who received a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Loan, Revenue Ruling 2020-27 and Revenue Procedure 2020-51, which clarifies the tax deductibility of expenses related to loans that have not been forgiven.

The PKF Texas team wants to share with you a special

Although planning is needed to help build the biggest possible nest egg in your traditional IRA (including a SEP-IRA and SIMPLE-IRA), it’s even more critical that you plan for withdrawals from these tax-deferred retirement vehicles.

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There are three areas where knowing the fine points of the IRA distribution rules can make a big difference in how much you and your family will keep after taxes:


Continue Reading Knowing the IRA Distribution Rules Can Make a Difference

Many people have Series EE bonds that were purchased many years ago. Perhaps they were given to your children as gifts or maybe you bought them yourself and put them away in a file cabinet or safe deposit box.

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You may wonder: How is the interest you earn on EE bonds taxed? And if they reach final maturity, what action do you need to take to ensure there’s no loss of interest or unanticipated tax consequences?


Continue Reading Series EE Bonds – What to Know and How They’re Taxed

Is your business closing? Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced many to shut down. If this is your situation, we’re here to assist you in any way we can, including taking care of the various tax obligations that must be met.

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Of course, a business must file a final income tax return and some other related forms for the year it closes. The type of return to be filed depends on the type of business you have.

Here’s a rundown of the basic requirements.


Continue Reading The Tax Responsibilities of Your Business Closing

When a couple gets divorced, taxes are probably not foremost in their minds. But without proper planning and advice, some people find divorce to be an even more taxing experience. Several tax concerns need to be addressed to ensure that taxes are kept to a minimum and that important tax-related decisions are properly made.

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Here are four issues to understand if you’re getting divorced.


Continue Reading 4 Tax Issues Divorced Couples Need to Know

If you invest in mutual funds, be aware of some potential pitfalls involved in buying and selling shares.

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Surprise Sales
You may already have made taxable “sales” of part of your mutual fund investment without knowing it.

One way this can happen is if your mutual fund allows you to write checks against your fund investment. Every time you write a check against your mutual fund account, you’ve made a partial sale of your interest in the fund. Thus, except for funds such as money market funds, for which share value remains constant, you may have taxable gain (or a deductible loss) when you write a check. And each such sale is a separate transaction that must be reported on your tax return.

Here’s another way you may unexpectedly make a taxable sale.


Continue Reading Avoid Tax Pitfalls of Mutual Funds

IRS audit rates are historically low, according to the latest data, but that’s little consolation if your return is among those selected to be examined. But with proper preparation and planning, you should fare well.

In fiscal year 2019, the IRS audited approximately 0.4% of individuals. Businesses, large corporations and high-income individuals are more likely to be audited but, overall, all types of audits are being conducted less frequently than they were a decade ago.

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There’s no 100% guarantee that you won’t be picked for an audit, because some tax returns are chosen randomly. However, the best way to survive an IRS audit is to prepare for one in advance. On an ongoing basis you should systematically maintain documentation — invoices, bills, cancelled checks, receipts, or other proof — for all items to be reported on your tax returns. Keep all your records in one place. And it helps to know what might catch the attention of the IRS.


Continue Reading Getting Ready for an IRS Audit in Advance

As a result of the current estate tax exemption amount ($11.58 million in 2020), many estates no longer need to be concerned with federal estate tax. Before 2011, a much smaller amount resulted in estate plans attempting to avoid it. Now, because many estates won’t be subject to tax, more planning can be devoted to saving income taxes for your heirs.

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While saving both income and transfer taxes has always been a goal of estate planning, it was more difficult to succeed at both when the estate and gift tax exemption level was much lower.

Here are some strategies to consider.


Continue Reading Plan for Income Taxes as Part of Your Estate Plan

The IRS has provided guidance to employers regarding the recent presidential action to allow employers the deferral of the withholding, deposit and payment of certain payroll tax obligations.

The three-page guidance in Notice 2020-65 was issued to implement President Trump’s executive memorandum signed on August 8.

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Private employers still have questions and concerns about whether, and how, to implement the optional deferral. The President’s action only defers the employee’s share of Social Security taxes; it doesn’t forgive them, meaning employees will still have to pay the taxes later unless Congress acts to eliminate the liability. (The payroll services provider for federal employers announced that federal employees will have their taxes deferred.)


Continue Reading Deferral of Your Employees’ Social Security Taxes