If you’re age 65 and older, and you have basic Medicare insurance, you may need to pay additional premiums to get the level of coverage you want. The premiums can be costly, especially if you’re married and both you and your spouse are paying them.

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But there may be a silver lining: You may qualify for a tax break for paying the premiums.


Continue Reading Can Seniors Deduct Medicare Premiums?

Perhaps you’re an investor in mutual fund shares or you’re interested in putting some money into them. You’re not alone.

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The Investment Company Institute estimates that 56.2 million households owned mutual funds in mid-2017. But despite their popularity, the tax rules involved in selling mutual fund shares can be complex.


Continue Reading The Tax Rules of Selling Mutual Fund Shares

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has affected many Americans’ finances.

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Here are some answers to questions you may have right now.

My employer closed the office and I’m working from home. Can I deduct any of the related expenses?
Unfortunately, no. If you’re an employee who telecommutes, there are strict rules that govern whether you can deduct home office expenses. For 2018–2025 employee home office expenses aren’t deductible. (Starting in 2026, an employee may deduct home office expenses, within limits, if the office is for the convenience of his or her employer and certain requirements are met.)

Be aware that these are the rules for employees. Business owners who work from home may qualify for home office deductions.


Continue Reading Your COVID-19 Tax Questions are Answered Here

On Thursday, April 30, 2020, the IRS released Notice 2020-32. Specifically, “this notice clarifies that no deduction is allowed under the Internal Revenue Code (Code) for an expense that is otherwise deductible if the payment of the expense results in forgiveness of a covered loan pursuant to section 1106(b) of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief

As a result of the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, your business may be using independent contractors to keep costs low. But you should be careful that these workers are properly classified for federal tax purposes. If the IRS reclassifies them as employees, it can be an expensive mistake.

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The question of whether a worker is an independent contractor or an employee for federal income and employment tax purposes is a complex one. If a worker is an employee, your company must withhold federal income and payroll taxes, pay the employer’s share of FICA taxes on the wages, plus FUTA tax. Often, a business must also provide the worker with the fringe benefits that it makes available to other employees. And there may be state tax obligations as well.

These obligations don’t apply if a worker is an independent contractor. In that case, the business simply sends the contractor a Form 1099-MISC for the year showing the amount paid (if the amount is $600 or more).


Continue Reading Hiring Independent Contractors During COVID-19

Last week, the IRS issued proposed regulations, which will help to simplify the rules around how not-for-profit entities should calculate their unrelated business income tax (UBIT) for more than one unrelated trade or business.

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UBIT is applicable to any trade or business activity a not-for-profit engages in that is not substantially related to the tax-exempt

As we all try to keep ourselves, our loved ones and our communities safe from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, you may be wondering about some of the recent tax changes which were part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act signed into law on March 27, 2020. The CARES Act contains a variety of relief, notably the “economic impact payments,” which will be made to people under a certain income threshold.

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But the law also makes some changes to retirement plan rules and provides a new tax break for some people who contribute to charity.


Continue Reading How CARES Act Changes Retirement Plan and Charitable Contribution Rules