Many taxpayers make charitable gifts — because they’re generous and they want to save money on their federal tax bills.

a box wrapped in brown paper wrapping with a pink ribbon bow tied on top; image used for a blog post about deductible charitable gifts on a tax return

But with the tax law changes that went into effect a couple years ago and the many rules that apply to charitable deductions, you may no longer get a tax break for your generosity.


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While you were celebrating the holidays, you may not have noticed that Congress passed a law with a grab bag of provisions that provide tax breaks to businesses and employers. The “Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020” was signed into law on December 20, 2019. It makes many changes to the tax code, including an extension (generally through 2020) of more than 30 provisions that were set to expire or already expired.

a close up view of a man wearing a black suit and a watch holding a newspaper with the word "business" on the cover; image used for a blog post about five tax breaks from the new tax law

Two other laws were passed as part of the law (The Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2019 and the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act).

Here are five highlights.


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The federal government spending package titled the “Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020,” does more than just fund the government. It extends certain income tax provisions which had already expired or were due to expire at the end of 2019. The agreement on the spending package also includes the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act.

U.S. Capitol building with American flag waving in front; image used for blog about tax law change update about extenders and provisions

Let’s look at some of the highlights.


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With Thanksgiving behind us, the holiday season is in full swing. At this time of year, your business may want to show its gratitude to employees and customers by giving them gifts or hosting holiday parties. It’s a good idea to understand the tax rules associated with these expenses.

a close up photo of a green christmas tree with red and pink glass ornaments with two brown-haired women in the background; image used for a blog post about tax breaks from holiday parties and gifts

Are they tax deductible by your business and is the value taxable to the recipients?


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If you’re a business owner and you hire your children (or grandchildren) this summer, you can obtain tax breaks and other nontax benefits. The kids can gain on-the-job experience, save for college and learn how to manage money.

And you may be able to:

  • Shift your high-taxed income into tax-free or low-taxed income,
  • Realize payroll tax savings (depending on the child’s age and how your business is organized), and
  • Enable retirement plan contributions for the children.


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When teachers are setting up their classrooms for the new school year, it’s common for them to pay for a portion of their classroom supplies out of pocket. A special tax break allows these educators to deduct some of their expenses. This educator expense deduction is especially important now due to some changes under the