Jen: This is the PKF Texas Entrepreneur’s Playbook. I’m Jen Lemanski, and I’m back again with Danielle Supkis Cheek, one of the faces of our fraud and forensics team. Danielle, welcome back to the Playbook.

Danielle: Thank you again for having me.

Jen: So, I’ve heard a little bit about treasury management. What do you do in that space, and what does that look like?

Danielle: Treasury management is just a fancy word for “banking services.” You’ll be able to reach out to your banker and find out what treasury management services they have, but it’s kind of the services that the bank offers you as a business customer typically.


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A not-for-profit capital campaign aims to raise a specific — usually, a significant — amount of money over a limited time period. Your not-for-profit may undertake a capital campaign to acquire land, buy a new facility, expand an existing facility, purchase major equipment or seed an endowment.

various arms extended to the center of the photo, with overlapping hands formed into a teamwork cheer; image used for a blog about executing a not-for-profit capital campaign

Whatever your goal, a capital campaign can be grueling, so you need to ensure stakeholders are on board and ready to do what it takes to reach it.


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The IRS announced it is opening the 2019 individual income tax return filing season on January 27. Even if you typically don’t file until much closer to the April 15 deadline (or you file for an extension), consider filing as soon as you can this year.

a black-ink pen lying next to tax withholding forms for a tax return

The reason: You can potentially protect yourself from tax identity theft — and you may obtain other benefits, too.


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A much-hated tax on not-for-profit organizations is on the way out. At the end of 2019, Congress repealed a provision of 2017’s Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), which triggered the unrelated business income tax (UBIT) of 21% on not-for-profit employers that provide employees with transportation fringe benefits.

a red monorail train speeding overhead people walking through a transportation terminal; image used for UBIT transportation fringe benefits blog post

Unequipped to handle the additional administrative burdens and compliance costs, thousands of not-for-profits had complained — and legislators apparently listened.


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While you were celebrating the holidays, you may not have noticed that Congress passed a law with a grab bag of provisions that provide tax breaks to businesses and employers. The “Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020” was signed into law on December 20, 2019. It makes many changes to the tax code, including an extension (generally through 2020) of more than 30 provisions that were set to expire or already expired.

a close up view of a man wearing a black suit and a watch holding a newspaper with the word "business" on the cover; image used for a blog post about five tax breaks from the new tax law

Two other laws were passed as part of the law (The Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2019 and the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act).

Here are five highlights.


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Jen: This is PKF Texas the Entrepreneurs Playbook. I’m Jen Lemanski, and I am back again with Danielle Supkis Cheek, a director and one of the faces of our PKF Texas Consulting team. Danielle, welcome back the Playbook.

Danielle: Always happy to be here.

Jen: So, we’ve had a few other directors in here talking about lease accounting, and I know the standards have changed a little bit since the last time we had—I think it was Chris Hatten was here. Can you give us a little bit of an overview about what’s happened with the delayed lease accounting standards?

Danielle: Yeah sure. The AICPA’s Technical Issues Committee actually wrote an unsolicited letter to the FASB requesting an extension related to… it was really mainly tied to… that we have a lot going on with the Revenue Recognition implementation, I think we talked about the past. And then adding it to the leases, the leases can change your balance sheet a lot, and I think we’ve had a lot of people talking about the implications to your balance sheet of the actual standard, that it can impact your covenants or various ratio analysis.


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Jen: This is the PKF Texas Entrepreneur’s Playbook. I’m Jen Lemanski, and I’m here with Danielle Supkis Cheek, a director in our Entrepreneurial Advisory Services group. Danielle, welcome back to the Playbook.

Danielle: Thank you for having me again.

Jen: I know revenue recognition is a hot topic right now; we’re getting ready to go into audit season. What are some trends you are seeing where clients need to get ready since it’s kind of a new thing that they should be ready for?

Danielle: A lot of clients, particularly certain industry types, have a tendency to kind of not dismiss revenue recognition, but they don’t perceive it as large of an impact. There’s a lot of areas where the revenue recognition rules effectively didn’t change too much, but there’s some really specific nuances that did change, as well as the auditors are going to be looking at how did somebody assess to see if it changed or not. So even in industries that didn’t change very much, there is a certain amount of documentation that needs to be in place for the company having assessed it.


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