In response to the transparency issues around proxy advisory firms, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) recently proposed new rules for proxy advisory firms. A proxy advisory firm helps institutional investors vote their shares at shareholder meetings. Because institutional investors have a wide variety of holdings, the specific risks and issues they must assess vary. The services proxy advisory firms provide include agenda assessment, research and recommendations on how to vote on shareholder proposals at publicly traded companies, and other offerings.

closeup shot of three men sitting at a wooden table by a glass window; image used for a blog post about the Securities Exchange Commission proposed rules for proxy advisory firms and shareholder voting

While more information can be a good thing, critics believe the additional information proxy advisory firms provide isn’t always conveyed with the best interests of Main Street investors in mind. So, if finalized, the SEC’s new rules would require proxy advisory firms to disclose more about their process and potential conflicts of interest and give companies the opportunity to make revisions before making final recommendations to clients. Specifically, the SEC’s proposals would revise the existing proxy advisory rules in three significant ways:


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