Although planning is needed to help build the biggest possible nest egg in your traditional IRA (including a SEP-IRA and SIMPLE-IRA), it’s even more critical that you plan for withdrawals from these tax-deferred retirement vehicles.

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There are three areas where knowing the fine points of the IRA distribution rules can make a big difference in how much you and your family will keep after taxes:


Continue Reading Knowing the IRA Distribution Rules Can Make a Difference

It’s often difficult for married couples to save as much as they need for retirement when one spouse doesn’t work outside the home — perhaps so that spouse can take care of children or elderly parents. In general, an IRA contribution is allowed only if a taxpayer has compensation. However, an exception involves a spousal IRA. It allows a contribution to be made for a nonworking spouse.

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Under the spousal IRA rules, the amount that a married couple can contribute to an IRA for a nonworking spouse in 2020 is $6,000, which is the same limit that applies for the working spouse.


Continue Reading Spousal IRA – What is it? What to Know

Do you want to save more for retirement on a tax-favored basis? If so, and if you qualify, you can make a deductible traditional IRA contribution for the 2019 tax year between now and the extended tax filing deadline and claim the write-off on your 2019 return. Or you can contribute to a Roth IRA and avoid paying taxes on future withdrawals.

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You can potentially make a contribution of up to $6,000 (or $7,000 if you were age 50 or older as of December 31, 2019). If you’re married, your spouse can potentially do the same, thereby doubling your tax benefits.

The deadline for 2019 traditional and Roth contributions for most taxpayers would have been April 15, 2020. However, because of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the IRS extended the deadline to file 2019 tax returns and make 2019 IRA contributions until July 15, 2020.

Of course, there are some ground rules. You must have enough 2019 earned income (from jobs, self-employment, etc.) to equal or exceed your IRA contributions for the tax year. If you’re married, either spouse can provide the necessary earned income.

Also, deductible IRA contributions are reduced or eliminated if last year’s modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is too high.


Continue Reading Do You Need to Make a Deductible IRA Contribution for 2019?

As we all try to keep ourselves, our loved ones and our communities safe from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, you may be wondering about some of the recent tax changes which were part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act signed into law on March 27, 2020. The CARES Act contains a variety of relief, notably the “economic impact payments,” which will be made to people under a certain income threshold.

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But the law also makes some changes to retirement plan rules and provides a new tax break for some people who contribute to charity.


Continue Reading How CARES Act Changes Retirement Plan and Charitable Contribution Rules

If you’re getting ready to file your 2019 tax return, and your tax bill is higher than you’d like, there may still be an opportunity to lower it. If you qualify, you can make a deductible contribution to a traditional IRA right up until the Wednesday, April 15, 2020, filing date and benefit from the resulting tax savings on your 2019 return.

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Continue Reading How an IRA Can Benefit Your 2019 Tax Return

As part of a year-end budget bill, Congress just passed a package of tax provisions that will provide savings for some taxpayers. The White House has announced President Trump will sign the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2020 into law. It also includes a retirement-related law titled the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act.

Here’s a rundown of some provisions in the two laws:


Continue Reading More Tax Provisions from Recent Tax Law Change Update

If you’re like many people, you’ve worked hard to accumulate a large nest egg in your traditional IRA (including a SEP-IRA). It’s even more critical to carefully plan for withdrawals from these retirement-savings vehicles.

Knowing the fine points of the IRA distribution rules can make a significant difference in how much you and your family will get to keep after taxes. Here are three IRA areas to understand:


Continue Reading Carefully Plan Your Traditional IRA Withdrawals…