Does anyone actually read footnotes? If they’re financial statement footnotes, the answer is usually “yes.” Footnotes can provide donors, governmental supporters and other stakeholders with critical information about your not-for-profit.

two businessmen writing on a document together; image used for blog post about using footnotes in a not-for-profit's financials

So it’s important to work with your CPA to make sure your footnotes are accurate and thorough.


Continue Reading How to Disclose NFP Financial Information with Footnotes

On Monday, February 10, 2020, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued a Proposed Accounting Standards Update (ASU) – “Not-for-Profit Entities (Topic 958).” The update aims to improve transparency of contributed nonfinancial assets — or more commonly referred to as in-kind donations — for not-for-profits by enhancing presentation and disclosure.

a box wrapped in pink paper with a gold ribbon tied into a bow, sprinkled with heart-shaped gold confetti; image used for blog post about proposed amendments for NFP nonfinancial assets from FASB

According to the draft of

Churches, synagogues, mosques and other religious congregations aren’t required to file tax returns, so they might not regularly hire independent accountants. But regardless of size, religious organizations often are subject to other requirements, such as paying unrelated business income tax (UBIT) and properly classifying employees.

Without the oversight of tax authorities or outside accountants, religious