After careful planning and collaboration with the Employee Benefit Plan Audit and Consulting niche team, PKF Texas hosted its first virtual Zoom webinar during the COVID-19 pandemic, “Retirement Plans: Navigating Recent Law Changes & Using Them to Your Advantage,” on June 25, 2020.

promotional image of Kristin Ryan, Carl Gillette and Brian Giovannini for a Zoom webinar about employee benefit plans during COVID-19 pandemic

The webinar featured Kristin Ryan, CPA, PKF Texas; Carl Gillette, Aon; and Brian Giovannini, Haynes and Boone, LLP, where they discussed:

  • Key provisions of the CARES Act, SECURE Act and other regulatory updates
  • Retirement plans design considerations and best practices
  • Implementation and potential roadblocks


Continue Reading Recap: Retirement Plans: Navigating Recent Law Changes Zoom Webinar

The IRS and the U.S. Treasury had disbursed 160.4 million Economic Impact Payments (EIP) as of May 31, 2020, according to a new report. These are the payments being sent to eligible individuals in response to the economic threats caused by COVID-19. The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports that $269.3 billion of EIPs have already been sent through a combination of electronic transfers to bank accounts, paper checks and prepaid debit cards.

woman holding hundred dollar bills fanned out; image used for blog post about returning economic impact payments (EIP) during COVID-19 pandemic

Eligible individuals receive $1,200 or $2,400 for a married couple filing a joint return. Individuals may also receive up to an additional $500 for each qualifying child. Those with adjusted gross income over a threshold receive a reduced amount.

However, the IRS says some payments were sent erroneously and should be returned.


Continue Reading You Might Need to Return Your EIP

Disclaimers:

  • The Small Business Administration and Department of Treasury are regularly releasing updated guidelines and clarifications related to the Paycheck Protection Program. Accordingly, the information provided here is subject to change as updates are released.
  • Further guidelines for the Paycheck Program Protection Loan Forgiveness application process are expected in the upcoming weeks. Borrowers should assess the guidelines and determine how to best apply to their situation. Additional consultation with your lender is encouraged.
  • The AICPA calculator Excel spreadsheet used in this video is current as of May 18, 2020. The AICPA will be updating it frequently, and we recommend using the most recent version.

Jen: Welcome to a special edition of the PKF Texas Entrepreneurs Playbook where we are going to walk you through the key points of the Paycheck Protection Program Loan Forgiveness application. I’d like to introduce Sam Razmandi, a Director on our Entrepreneurial Advisory Services team.

Sam: I’m happy to be here. Today I’ll be covering:

Before we get started please keep in mind that the information is subject to change and is intended to be a general overview. Let’s go and get started.


Continue Reading Walkthrough of the Paycheck Protection Program Loan Forgiveness Application

One of the strongest predictors of a not-for-profit’s long-term survival is multiple revenue sources. Many organizations with only one or two found that out that the hard way when they failed during the 2008 recession.

a hand pointing to a computer screen with a web page about revenue streams; image used for blog post about not-for-profit revenue sources

The same is likely to be true for not-for-profits that do — or don’t — survive the current novel coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis.


Continue Reading Finding Multiple Revenue Sources During a Crisis

Nearly everyone has heard about potentially receiving an Economic Impact Payment (EIP), which the federal government is sending to help mitigate the effects of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The IRS reports that in the first four weeks of the program, 130 million individuals received payments worth more than $200 billion.

one-dollar bills scattered across the floor; image used for blog post about economic impact payment during COVID-19 pandemic

However, some people are still waiting for a payment. And others received an EIP but it was less than what they were expecting. Here are some answers why this might have happened.


Continue Reading Was Your Economic Impact Payment Lower Than Expected?

The Small Business Administration (SBA) and Department of Treasury released the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Loan Forgiveness Application with detailed instructions on Friday, May 15, 2020.

hands typing on a laptop; image used for a COVID-19 update about the Paycheck Protection Program Loan Forgiveness Application

The SBA form has instructions that include:

  • The option for borrowers to calculate payroll costs using an “alternative payroll covered period” that aligns with borrowers’ regular payroll cycles
  • Flexibility

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis has put enormous financial stress on many not-for-profits — whether they’re temporarily shut down or actively fighting the pandemic. If cash flow has dried up, your organization may need to do more than trim expenses.

a pencil and eraser point to a drawing of a lightbulb with a question mark in the middle; image used for blog post about assessing a not-for-profit's financial situation

Here’s how to assess your financial condition and take appropriate action.


Continue Reading How is Your Not-for-Profit’s Financial Situation?

Do you want to save more for retirement on a tax-favored basis? If so, and if you qualify, you can make a deductible traditional IRA contribution for the 2019 tax year between now and the extended tax filing deadline and claim the write-off on your 2019 return. Or you can contribute to a Roth IRA and avoid paying taxes on future withdrawals.

a glass vase sits on a wooden table filled with coins and a small plant growing from it; image used for a blog about deductible IRA contribution for 2019

You can potentially make a contribution of up to $6,000 (or $7,000 if you were age 50 or older as of December 31, 2019). If you’re married, your spouse can potentially do the same, thereby doubling your tax benefits.

The deadline for 2019 traditional and Roth contributions for most taxpayers would have been April 15, 2020. However, because of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the IRS extended the deadline to file 2019 tax returns and make 2019 IRA contributions until July 15, 2020.

Of course, there are some ground rules. You must have enough 2019 earned income (from jobs, self-employment, etc.) to equal or exceed your IRA contributions for the tax year. If you’re married, either spouse can provide the necessary earned income.

Also, deductible IRA contributions are reduced or eliminated if last year’s modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is too high.


Continue Reading Do You Need to Make a Deductible IRA Contribution for 2019?