If you’re approaching retirement, you probably want to ensure the money you’ve saved in retirement plans lasts as long as possible. If so, be aware that a law was recently enacted that makes significant changes to retirement accounts.

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The SECURE Act, which was signed into law in late 2019, made a number of changes of interest to those nearing retirement.


Continue Reading The SECURE Act and Your Retirement Savings

Contributing to a tax-advantaged retirement plan can help you reduce taxes and save for retirement. If your employer offers a 401(k) or Roth 401(k) plan, contributing to it is a smart way to build a substantial sum of money.

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If you’re not already contributing the maximum allowed, consider increasing your contribution rate. Because of tax-deferred compounding (tax-free in the case of Roth accounts), boosting contributions can have a major impact on the size of your nest egg at retirement.

With a 401(k), an employee makes an election to have a certain amount of pay deferred and contributed by an employer on his or her behalf to the plan. The contribution limit for 2020 is $19,500. Employees age 50 or older by year end are also permitted to make additional “catch-up” contributions of $6,500, for a total limit of $26,000 in 2020.

The IRS recently announced that the 401(k) contribution limits for 2021 will remain the same as for 2020.


Continue Reading Save for Retirement by Maximizing Your 401(k) Plan

Russ: This is the PKF Texas Entrepreneur’s Playbook. I’m Russ Capper, this week’s guest host, and I’m here once again with Kristin Ryan, Audit Senior Manager and one of the faces of PKF Texas’ employee benefit plan team. Kristin, welcome back to the Playbook.

Kristin: Thank you. Glad to be here.

Russ: Okay, so, I understand we’re going to talk today about the SECURE Act?

Kristin: That’s right. So, the SECURE Act has been a big buzz lately. It was signed on December 20th by the President, and the over-arching goal is to encourage participation in plans and retirement savings.

Russ: Well, I always think the way to encourage participation is have company matching funds. Is that right?


Continue Reading Best of… The SECURE Act – What You Need to Know

Russ: This is the PKF Texas Entrepreneur’s Playbook. I’m Russ Capper, this week’s guest host, and I’m here once again with Kristin Ryan, Audit Senior Manager and one of the faces of PKF Texas’ employee benefit plan team. Kristin, welcome back to the Playbook.

Kristin: Thank you. Glad to be here.

Russ: Okay, so, I understand we’re going to talk today about the SECURE Act?

Kristin: That’s right. So, the SECURE Act has been a big buzz lately. It was signed on December 20th by the President, and the over-arching goal is to encourage participation in plans and retirement savings.

Russ: Well, I always think the way to encourage participation is have company matching funds. Is that right?


Continue Reading The SECURE Act – What You Need to Know

The federal government spending package titled the “Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020,” does more than just fund the government. It extends certain income tax provisions which had already expired or were due to expire at the end of 2019. The agreement on the spending package also includes the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act.

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Let’s look at some of the highlights.


Continue Reading Tax Law Change Update: Extenders and Provisions

Do you want to save more for retirement on a tax-favored basis? If so, and if you qualify, you can make a deductible traditional IRA contribution for the 2018 tax year between now and the tax filing deadline and claim the write-off on your 2018 return. Or you can contribute to a Roth IRA and avoid paying taxes on future withdrawals.

You can potentially make a contribution of up to $5,500 (or $6,500 if you were age 50 or older as of December 31, 2018). If you’re married, your spouse can potentially do the same, thereby doubling your tax benefits.

The deadline for 2018 traditional and Roth contributions for most taxpayers is April 15, 2019 (April 17 for those in Maine and Massachusetts).

There are some ground rules.
Continue Reading It’s Not Too Late to Make a Deductible IRA Contribution for 2018

Retirement plan contribution limits are indexed for inflation, and many have gone up for 2019, giving you opportunities to increase your retirement savings.

  • Elective deferrals to 401(k), 403(b), 457(b)(2) and 457(c)(1) plans: $19,000 (up from $18,500)
  • Contributions to defined contribution plans: $56,000 (up from $55,000)
  • Contributions to SIMPLEs: $13,000 (up from $12,500)
  • Contributions to IRAs:

Will you be age 50 or older on December 31? Are you still working? Are you already contributing to your 401(k) plan or Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE) up to the regular annual limit? Then you may want to make “catch-up” contributions by the end of the year. Increasing your retirement plan contributions